Colombia | Britain | Japan | USA

Sibylla Brodzinsky, Jonathan Watts: Colombia and Farc rebels sign historic ceasefire deal to end 50-year conflict (Guardian)

The Colombian government and Farc guerrillas have declared the final day of one of the world’s oldest wars with the signing of a ceasefire agreement to end more than 50 years of bloodshed.
“May this be the last day of the war,” said Farc chief Timoleón “Timochenko” Jiménez, his voice choked with tears.
“We are close to a final peace accord,” he said, after shaking hands with Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos at the signing ceremony in Havana, which was attended by the UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon.

Reuters: Colombian Farc rebel unit rejects peace deal, saying it will not disarm (Guardian)
Sibylla Brodzinsky: ‘Unarmed, we are nothing’: Farc guerrillas wary of future without guns (Guardian)

Michael Hudson: The Silence of the Left: Brexit, Euro-Austerity and the T-TIP (CounterPunch)

The Maastricht and Lisbon treaties – along with the German constitution – deprive the eurozone of having a central bank to spend money to revive the European economy. Instead of working to heal the economy from the debt deflation that has occurred since 2008, the European Central Bank (ECB) finances banks and obliges governments to save bondholders from loss instead of writing down bad debts.
To top matters, Brussels bureaucrats seem quite bendable to U.S. pressures to sign the T-TIP: the Obama Administration’s neoliberal Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. This is a corporatist program shifting regulatory policy into corporate hands, away from government: environmental policy, public health policy and food labeling for starters.
The Brussels bureaucracy has been hijacked not only by the banks, but by NATO. It pretends that there is a real danger of Russia mounting a military invasion of Europe – as if any country in the world today could mount a land war against another…
What used to be a socialist left has been silent about the fact that there are very good reasons for people to say that this is not the kind of Europe they want to be a part of. It is becoming a dead zone. And it cannot be “democratized” without replacing the Lisbon and Maastricht treaties on which it is founded, and removing German opposition to public spending on recovery for Spain, Italy, Portugal, Greece and other countries.

Joyce Nelson: Post-Brexit, Is the EU Flaunting Its Undemocratic Tendencies? (CounterPunch)

Stung by Brexit, the EU bureaucrats seem intent on showing just how undemocratic they can be. Here are two examples just in the last seven days…
On June 24, EU member states again refused (for a third time this year) to approve a renewal of the license for the weed-killer glyphosate manufactured by Monsanto and other corporations involved in GMO crop cultivation. That should have meant that the license would expire by the end of June, and Monsanto’s Roundup and other glyphosate weed-killers would have to be withdrawn from Europe by the end of this year.
Instead, on June 29 the European Commission (EC) decided “unilaterally” to extend the glyphosate license for another 18 months…
On June 28, a German news agency reported that European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker told EU leaders the Commission is planning to push through a controversial free trade agreement between Canada and the EU – known as CETA, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement – without giving national parliaments any say in it. [7] According to the German press, Juncker argued that allowing national parliaments to vote on the agreement would “paralyze the process” and raise questions about the EU’s “credibility.”

Sean Bell: The End of the United Kingdom? (Jacobin)

Brexit has suddenly made Scottish independence and a united Ireland possible. What does it mean for the Left?

Costas Lapavitsas: Why They Left (Jacobin)

Brexit wasn’t the first time Europeans rejected the EU, and it won’t be the last. Here’s what the Left should do.

Serge Halimi: Why Britain walked out / Une Europe à refaire (Monde diplomatique)

The EU, brainchild of an intellectual elite, born in a world divided by war, missed one of history’s great choices, or opportunities, to take another route 25 years ago…
But instead of a community, it built a market. Bristling with commissioners, rules for member states, penalties for its peoples, yet wide open to competition among workers, soulless and with only one aim — to serve the wealthiest and best connected in financial centres and major metropolises…
The protests expressed in the British vote cannot be dismissed solely as populism or xenophobia. And it is not by further reducing national sovereignty, in favour of a federal Europe almost nobody wants, that our politically discredited elites will assuage the popular anger unleashed in the UK — and rising elsewhere.

Paul Mason: UK: lost, divided and alone (Monde diplomatique)

The Brexit vote was a insurrectionary protest against neoliberalism, globalism and cultural contempt. It will break up the UK, and split England forever.

Dimiar Indzhov: After Brexit: the EU Needs to Abandon Austerity or Face More Exits (CounterPunch)

Chilcot delivers crushing verdict on Blair and the Iraq war (Guardian)
Tony Blair deliberately exaggerated threat from Iraq, Chilcot report finds (Guardian)
Spy agencies ‘produced flawed information on Saddam’s WMDs’ (Guardian)
Bush largely ignored advice on postwar Iraq, Chilcot inquiry finds (Guardian)
Lee Williams: Chilcot has underlined exactly why Labour needs Jeremy Corbyn – one of the brave few to oppose the Iraq War (Independent)
Ian Black: Blair says the Middle East is better off post-Saddam, but is this true? (Guardian)
Owen Jones: The war in Iraq was not a blunder or a mistake. It was a crime (Guardian)
Jeffrey St. Clair, Alexander Cockburn: Iraq’s Weapons of Mass Destruction: Who Said What When (CounterPunch)

Justin McCurry: Japan could change pacifist constitution after Shinzo Abe victory (Guardian)

Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe [Abe Shinzō 安倍 晋三], has called for a debate on rewriting the country’s pacifist constitution after his Liberal Democratic party [LDP, Jiyū-Minshutō 自由民主党] and its allies secured a supermajority in upper house elections on Sunday.
The LDP, its junior coalition partner Kōmeitō [公明党], and several like-minded smaller parties and independent MPs now control two-thirds of the 242 seats in the upper house. The ruling coalition already has a similar majority in the more powerful lower house.

Yan Lei, Liu Tian: Abe’s victory in Upper House election threat to Japan, regional stability (Xinhua)

The Japanese ruling camp led by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has won a majority in Sunday’s upper house election, which means Abe’s coalition and like-minded parties managed to take the two-thirds majority needed to try to revise the nation’s post-war pacifist Constitution.
The victory, though came as no surprise to the public, could pose a danger to Japan and regional stability, as it means Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will snatch more power and put Japan’s Constitution in jeopardy…
For one thing, Abe has been touting the so-called “achievements” of his economic policies dubbed “Abenomics”, referring only to favorable economic data, while being evasive about his true political agenda which is to revise the pacifist Constitution, a strategy that successfully disarmed many voters who are against constitutional revision.
For another, the voters, though discontent with Abe’s policies, felt a lack of better choices, as they are equally dissatisfied with the opposition parties, which seemed to have also failed to offer feasible solutions to the problems that Japan is faced with. Many people, therefore, chose to vote to keep the status quo, or even refused to vote.

Jason Burke: More than 300 dead as South Sudan capital is rocked by violence (Guardian)

Jon Swaine, Edward Helmore: Hundreds arrested amid new protests as details of Dallas gunman’s plans emerge (Guardian)

Military-style vehicles, teargas and smoke grenades returned to American streets for the first time this summer, and Barack Obama appealed for calm and said those who attack law enforcement undermine the cause of social justice.

David Wainer, Jonathan Ferziger, Ahmed Feteha: Old Mideast Foes Unite Over Gas Deals and Fighting Militants (Bloomberg)

Nearly four decades after their peace accord changed the face of the Middle East, Israel and Egypt are slowly turning a cool relationship into an alliance. They have tightened security cooperation to unprecedented levels and have been laying the legal groundwork for a multi-billion dollar energy contract, as gas discoveries in the Mediterranean and the persistent threat from Islamist militants shift the political dynamics across the region.

Israel Launched Numerous Drone Strikes in Sinai (Haaretz)

The attacks have been carried out in recent years, former Israeli official tells Bloomberg. Israel’s deputy army chief says cooperation between Israel and Egypt has never been better.

Jacob Kornbluh: Clinton Supporters Reject Democratic Platform Amendment Calling to ‘End’ Israeli Settlements (Jewish Insider / Haaretz)
Mira Sucharov: For Diaspora Jews, the Occupation Can’t Just Be a Spectator Sport (Haaretz)

An eternal debate that is relevant not just in the US, but in many countries:
John Halle, Noam Chomsky: An Eight-Point Brief for LEV (Lesser Evil Voting) (Outrages and Interludes)
Andrew Smolski: No Lesser Evil, Not this Time (CounterPunch)
Andrew Smolski: To My Less-Evilism Haters: A Rejoinder to Halle and Chomsky (CounterPunch)
Jeffrey St. Clair: Noam Chomsky, John Halle and a Confederacy of Lampreys: a Note on Lesser Evil Voting (CounterPunch)

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