Sudan | Syria | USA | Korea | Britain

Nick Turse: Ghost Nation (Harper’s)

South Sudan was an American nation-building experiment, the recipient of $11 billion in assistance since 2005—perhaps the largest investment the United States has made in sub-Saharan Africa. Washington and other international partners trained soldiers and mentored government officials, but they ignored the country’s stunted economic, military, and political development, which left South Sudan mired in corruption, ethnoracism, and violence. Six years after independence, most people still lack electricity, phone networks are spotty, and paved roads are nonexistent outside the capital, Juba.
In July 2013, South Sudan began to unravel. Riek Machar, the vice president—a member of the second-largest tribe, the Nuer—was fired by Kiir, then announced that he would challenge him in upcoming elections, which were never held. That December, government forces killed large numbers of Nuer soldiers and civilians on the streets of Juba. Rebel forces loyal to Machar responded, massacring Dinkas in villages and towns in the north.
In 2014, as the conflict raged between the ­S.P.L.A. and Machar’s rebels, known as the Sudan People’s Liberation Army—In Opposition (I.O.), Kiir visited the White House. A former guerrilla, he is often photographed in one of the cowboy hats given to him by President George W. Bush or Secretary of State John Kerry. Unwilling to pressure Kiir and the leaders they had fostered, the Obama Administration failed to impose a unilateral arms embargo. An eleventh-hour push for an international arms ban at the U.N. Security Council collapsed, in part because the outgoing administration lacked sufficient political capital. As a result, Kiir has been able to purchase $1 billion worth of arms, including tanks and helicopter gunships.
During the early stages of the current conflict, the south of the country had been largely spared. But South Sudan is riven by all manner of differences and enmities. In the north, the Dinka are cattle keepers. The south is made up of the Equatorias—Central, Western, and Eastern. The region is the breadbasket of the country, with fields of cassava, sorghum, peanuts, and maize and orchards of fruit trees. For years, Dinkas had moved huge herds into Equatorian farmland, and in 2015, these land grabs escalated into skirmishes between the ­S.P.L.A. and homegrown militias…
After South Sudan erupted in civil war in 2013, tens of thousands of civilians ran to United Nations bases, seeking protection from rampaging soldiers. Many have been stranded there ever since. Today, more than 200,000 South Sudanese live behind berms and razor wire in these sanctuaries-cum-prisons, 3.6 million have fled their homes, and more than 7.5 million need aid and protection…
Last November, the United Nations also began warning about the potential for genocide in South Sudan.

Seymour M. Hersh: Trump’ Red Line (Welt, free) Vergeltungsschlag in Syrien. Trumps rote Linie (Welt, behind paywall)

On April 6, United States President Donald Trump authorized an early morning Tomahawk missile strike on Shayrat Air Base in central Syria in retaliation for what he said was a deadly nerve agent attack carried out by the Syrian government two days earlier in the rebel-held town of Khan Sheikhoun. Trump issued the order despite having been warned by the U.S. intelligence community that it had found no evidence that the Syrians had used a chemical weapon.

Am 6. April 2017 gab US-Präsident Donald Trump den Befehl, mehrere Dutzend Tomahawk-Marschflugkörper abzuschießen. Ziel war der syrische Stützpunkt Al-Schairat. Die Raketen schlugen in den frühen Morgenstunden ein. Es sollte ein Vergeltungsschlag sein – für den Angriff des Assad-Regimes auf die Rebellen-Hochburg Chan Scheichun. Bei dieser Operation, so erklärte Trump, sei tödliches Nervengift eingesetzt worden. Dabei hatten die US-amerikanischen Nachrichtendienste den Präsidenten gewarnt: Es sei keinesfalls bewiesen, dass Assads Luftwaffe tatsächlich Chemiewaffen eingesetzt hatte.

Seymour M. Hersh: „We got a fuckin‘ problem“ (Welt)
Aaron Maté, Seymour M. Hersh:
Jonathan Cook:
Hersh’s New Syria Revelations Buried From View (CounterPunch)

Paradoxically, over the past decade, as social media has created a more democratic platform for information dissemination, the corporate media has grown ever more fearful of a truly independent figure like Hersh. The potential reach of his stories could now be enormously magnified by social media. As a result, he has been increasingly marginalised and his work denigrated. By denying him the credibility of a “respectable” mainstream platform, he can be dismissed for the first time in his career as a crank and charlatan. A purveyor of fake news…
Hersh’s new investigation was paid for by the London Review of Books, which declined to publish it. This is almost disturbing as the events in question.
What is emerging is a media blackout so strong that even the London Review of Books is running scared. Instead, Hersh’s story appeared yesterday in a German publication, Welt am Sonntag.

Reuters: US threatens Syria, says Assad is planning chemical weapons attack’ (Daily Star)

Sarah Dougherty, Scott A. Allen: Nuremberg Betrayed: Human Experimentation and the CIA Torture Program (Physicians for Human Rights)

PHR researchers show that CIA contract psychologists James Mitchell and Bruce Jessen created a research program in which health professionals designed and applied torture techniques and collected data on torture’s effects. This constitutes one of the gravest breaches of medical ethics by U.S. health personnel since the Nuremberg Code was developed in the wake of Nazi medical atrocities committed during World War Two.

Roy Eidelson: Heart of Darkness: Observations on a Torture Notebook (CounterPunch)

Just in time for the Trump Administration’s official embrace of brutality, we have another book defending torture: Enhanced Interrogation by psychologist James Mitchell. For those unfamiliar with the author, he’s a central figure in the Senate Intelligence Committee’s scathing 2014 report summary on CIA abuse. And he’s a co-defendant — for having “designed, implemented, and personally administered an experimental torture program” — in the ACLU’s lawsuit on behalf of three war-on-terror detainees (Suleiman Abdullah Salim, Mohamed Ahmed Ben Soud, and the estate of the deceased Gul Rahman).

Sheri Fink, James Risen: Psychologists Open a Window on Brutal C.I.A. Interrogations (New York Times)

A lawsuit filed on behalf of former prisoners reveals new details about a program that used techniques widely viewed as torture.

Heo Jae-hyun: North Korean defector desperately wants to go home, but is facing possible arrest (Hankyoreh)

A North Korean defector who has demanded repatriation, claiming she was tricked by a defection broker and came to South Korea by mistake, is once again in danger of arrest.
Police are closing in with their investigation of Kim Ryon-hui, 48, and considering requesting an arrest warrant for her on charges of National Security Law violations. In response, Kim and civic groups supporting her held a press conference on June 14 to demand her repatriation.

Will Ripley: Defector wants to return to North Korea (CNN)

Of the tens of thousands of North Koreans who have fled to South Korea since the Great Famine of the late 1990’s, only a rare few have ever asked to return.
Kim Ryon Hui is one of them. The Pyongyang dressmaker — turned North Korean defector — says she is trapped in South Korea and desperate to return to her family.

Mark Steel: Crazy Marxists want to give homes to Grenfell survivors – but thankfully we live in a fair capitalist society (Independent)

It’s the same with those communists who went down with blankets and food. They should have set up a pop-up bedding and hot chocolate store to tap into extensive market opportunities.

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