Turkey | Brexit | USA | Israel/Palestine

Sungur Savran: Turkey: A war of two coups (RedMed) / Πόλεμος δύο πραξικοπήματον (Εργατικό Επαναστατικό Κόμμα)

On the night of 15-16 July, Turkey went through a cataclysm that stunned the world: a huge section of the armed forces of the country (TSK in its Turkish acronym) attempted to take power from the government of Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and the AKP, came very close to its objective, but was ultimately defeated. Official statements of imperialist countries celebrate the triumph of democracy. Nothing can be farther from the truth. Furthermore, many commentators, remaining captive to the official explanation of the AKP government, point to the followers of Fethullah Gülen, a powerful imam who has been residing in the US for close to two decades now, as the culprit behind the coup. This is a mystification used by the AKP for various purposes, the most important being to ostracise the Gülenists and to hide from view that a much wider array of forces within the army have taken up arms. And on the left and far left, many are filled with excitement at the sight of civilians climbing over tanks and challenging with bare hands the heavily armed soldiers of the putschist forces. This, too, is a very distorted picture.
The correct characterisation of the coup is not one of democracy defeating dictatorship. Two despotic forces faced each other and the more gradualist one won…
Historically speaking, the Turkish bourgeoisie has been firmly committed to the so-called Western alliance. After World War Two, the country took its place as the only majority Muslim country in organisations as diverse as the European Council, the OECD, and NATO and has been desperately trying its hand at accession to the European Union (EU) for a full half century. This was very much in consonance with the orientation of the Kemalist republic established in 1923, which adopted a line which almost forcibly tore Turkish society from Islamic or oriental mores, customs, and culture and tried to make it a part of what Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the strongman of Kemalism, called “contemporary civilisation”, i.e. the Western world. The unstoppable rise of the Islamist movement from the 1970s onwards was closely related to the profound reaction of the working masses and the poor of the country to this forcible move and the divide between them and the ways of the bourgeoisie not only socio-economically but also culturally. Having taken over the position of leadership in this movement from the historic leader Erbakan in the early 2000s, Erdoğan, a capitalist merchant of humble beginnings, seemed to the masses as “their man”. This, in effect, explains an overwhelming part of his extremely charismatic popularity with half the electorate.
This, of course, is only half the story. The other part is the rise of what was a provincial bourgeoisie, aspiring to become rich and powerful like their earlier dominant Westernised class brethren, but, feeling like the underdog, produced a different kind of political movement which posed an alternative programme of Islamic unity, not only politically but economically as well. This wing grew beyond a provincial wing of the bourgeoisie into finance capital by the 1990s, they strove for power. The AKP is the expression of this class fraction.

Peter Schwarz: US and Germany livid over failure of Turkish coup (World Socialist Web Site)

Judging by the reactions of the American and German governments to the failed coup in Turkey, there can be no doubt that they supported the rebels politically and had hoped for their success.
Washington, like Berlin, allowed much time to pass before tersely condemning the coup, only speaking out unequivocally when it was clear that the rebels had failed.

Turkish coupists planned to charge Erdogan with overly gentle treatment of Kurds (RT)

Those behind the the attempted coup in Turkey planned to accuse President Erdogan and his inner circle of aiding terror by negotiating with the PKK before launching a military crackdown on Kurds, Turkish media reported citing a document recovered by police.
A petition to initiate a judicial process against the Turkish government was discovered during a search of the office of Public Prosecutor Mehmet Sel in Istanbul, who was detained following the failed coup attempt.

Sam Jones: Separatist movement in Catalonia escalates battle with Madrid (Guardian)

The separatist movement in Catalonia’s parliament has escalated its battle with Madrid after it defied Spain’s constitutional court by debating a controversial pro-independence roadmap, and the region’s president announced a confidence vote to consolidate the move towards sovereignty…
Last November, the Catalan parliament voted to begin the process of breaking away from Spain after separatist MPs used their majority to pass legislation to effect a “disconnection from the Spanish state” and pave the way for an independent Catalan state.

The EU and Britain – beacons of democracy:
Karthick Arvinth: Brexit vote is not legally binding, say lawyers (International Business Times)

More than 1,000 lawyers across the UK have signed a letter addressed to Prime Minister David Cameron insisting that last month’s vote to leave the European Union is not legally binding.

Jacob Kornbluh: GOP Platform to Drop Support for Two State Solution (Haaretz / Jewish Insider)

‘We reject the false notion that Israel is an occupier,’ reads platform draft. According to people involved in the draft, Trump’s Israel advisers and pro-Israel groups in Republican Party worked together to take out support for Palestinian state.

Yair Ettinger: Israel Destroys 20 Palestinian Structures in East Jerusalem (Haaretz, also via Google News)

Police use riot-control measures to quell protests against destruction of buildings, some beyond the separation barrier in Palestinian locales.

Larry Derfner: Why Are Israeli Soldiers Fraternizing With Hebron’s Most Racist, Terrorist-inciting Settlers? (Haaretz, also via Google News)

Boston-born Hebron settler Baruch Marzel glorifies Arab-killers. We shouldn’t be surprised that one of his regular Shabbat lunchtime guests, Sgt. Elor Azaria, is on trial for shooting dead an incapacitated Palestinian.

Vivian Eden: The Mahmoud Darwish Poem That Enraged Lieberman and Regev (Haaretz)

An Army Radio discussion of an early work by Mahmoud Darwish has caused an uproar. Here is the poem: ID Card.

Israeli liberals are seriously worried:
Gideon Levy: כן, מדינת רשע | Stop Living in Denial, Israel Is an Evil State (Haaretz, also via Google News)

אחרי שאמרנו לאומנות וגזענות, שנאת ערבים וזילות חייהם, פולחן ביטחון והתנגדות לכיבוש, התקרבנות ומשיחיות, צריך להוסיף עוד מרכיב אחד, שבלעדיו אי אפשר להסביר את התנהגותו של משטר הכיבוש הישראלי: הרוע. הרוע המזוקק. הרוע הסדיסטי. הרוע לשמו. לפעמים הוא ההסבר היחיד.
After we’ve cited nationalism and racism, hatred and contempt for Arab life, the security cult and resistance to the occupation, victimhood and messianism, one more element must be added without which the behavior of the Israeli occupation regime cannot be explained: Evil. Pure evil. Sadistic evil. Evil for its own sake. Sometimes, it’s the only explanation.

Gideon Levy: What Sort of Society Feels Absolutely Nothing After Killing Hundreds of Children? (Haaretz, also via Google News)

Israel killed 546 Palestinian children over the course of only 50 days in Gaza in 2014. Of those, 180 were babies and toddlers under the age of five…
Try to imagine – the army killed 546 children in the course of 50 days. More than 10 children a day, a classroom every three days. Try to imagine.

Eva Illouz: הגיעה העת לבחון מחדש את הבנאליות של הרוע (Haaretz, also via Google News)

להפחית במשמעות של מקרה אלאור אזריה כמקרה בודד היא סוג של פשיטת רגל מוסרית. המעשים האלה מהווים דפוס עקבי. יהיו שיטענו כי הדפוס הזה טמון בשורשי הציונות עצמה. אני סבורה שניתן לזהותו באידיאולוגיית ההתנחלויות, שעיוותה לחלוטין את רוחה וכוונותיה של הציונות על ידי הכללתן בהשקפה משיחית וקידוש האדמה

Gary Jones: The Chinese volunteers who fought in the Spanish civil war – their amazing courage and obscure fates (South China Morning Post)

Illiterate farmers, manual labourers, civil servants – some 100 Chinese joined the International Brigades helping fight General Franco’s fascists 80 years ago. Despite being few in number, they left a lasting impression.

And some theories from mainstream economics:
Marshall Steinbaum: Should the Middle Class Fear the World’s Poor? (Boston Review)

France | USA

Glenn Greenwald, Nermeen Shaikh, Amy Goodman: “Shameless” U.S. Officials Exploit Paris Attacks to Defend Spying & Attack Snowden (Democracy Now)

As France and Belgium move to expand state power in the aftermath of the Paris attacks, top U.S. officials have renewed a push to defend mass surveillance and dismiss those who challenge it. On Wednesday, FBI Director James Comey said intelligence and law enforcement officials need to have access to encrypted information on smartphones, despite no evidence that the Paris attackers used encryption. Meanwhile, others have used the Paris attacks to criticize NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. In recent days, CIA Director John Brennan has suggested revelations about mass spying have made it harder to find terrorists, while former CIA Director James Woolsey has said Snowden has blood on his hands. “We have not heard such blatant, shameless lying from intelligence and military officials since 2002 and 2003 when they propagandized the country into invading Iraq based on utterly false pretenses,” says The Intercept’s Glenn Greenwald, the Pulitzer-winning journalist who exposed NSA mass surveillance based on Snowden’s leaks.

Amy Goodman, Nermeen Shaikh: Glenn Greenwald on “Submissive” Media’s Drumbeat for War and “Despicable” Anti-Muslim Scapegoating (Democracy Now)
Grey Anderson: The French Emergency (Jacobin)

From Algeria to the Paris attacks, French elites have used state of emergency legislation to consolidate power and repress dissent.

Ian Birchall: The Wrong Kind of Secularism (Jacobin)

The French secular ideal of laïcité is not a misused noble idea — it is deeply flawed at its roots…
Today laïcité serves as a justification for a variety of things — from banning headscarf-wearing mothers from accompanying their children on school outings to telling Muslim and Jewish schoolchildren that they must eat pork or go hungry.
But laïcité is not simply an idea that has been appropriated by the Right for political or cultural ends; it is also a value claimed by the Left, even the far left…
In 1886 Lafargue published a satire entitled La Religion du capital (The Religion of Capital). He imagined a conference in London with economic and political representatives of European capitalism — Clemenceau, Rothschild, Gladstone, Herbert Spencer, von Moltke, etc. Among those attending were Ferry and Paul Bert, who as education minister had been one of Ferry’s main allies in establishing laïcité. Their concern was to enable the survival of capitalism. And for that, a religion of some sort was required…
Some of the sharpest criticism of laïcité came from the anarchist and syndicalist currents; the anarchist position could be summed up as “neither the church nor the state.” As Sébastien Faure put it, the Christian school was “organised by the Church and for it, while the “école laïque” was “organised by the state and for it.” He counterposed the idea of “the school of the future . . . organised for the child.” André Lorulot put it rather more crudely, calling state schoolteachers “intellectual cops of the capitalist class.”…
Despite some opposing voices, laïcité largely achieved its goal of solidifying a national identity backed by military might…
The traditions of criticism of laïcité persisted after the First World War. The journal Clarté, close to but not entirely controlled by the Communist Party, reported on educational developments in post-revolutionary Russia that might offer an alternative to church or state education. An educational conference held in Moscow in 1919, for instance, dismissed academic neutrality and laïcité as a “mug’s game” (attrape-nigaud) designed to serve the interests of the bourgeoisie…
Today, with the concept being used in the service of Islamophobia, it is especially important to knock laïcité down from its elevated status. And that requires understanding laïcité not as a noble ideal that has been misinterpreted and distorted, but as deeply flawed from the outset.

The media after Paris: from fear to loathing, by way of made-up facts (Guardian)

Anti-immigration sentiment across Europe begins to make more sense when you realise that Brits and Spaniards think they have twice as many immigrants in their country as they actually do, the Italians, Belgians and French assume there are three times as many as there are, the Hungarians eight times and the Poles more than 30 times.

Gilbert Achcar: France Returns to the State of Exception (Jacobin)

The discourse of war is already upon us. But it must be resisted.

Don’t let them use Paris as a pretext! (International Action Center)
John Catalinotto: Historic crimes of the French military (International Action Centre)

Many young people in Paris were innocent victims of the Nov. 13 attack, but that doesn’t mean that the French imperialist state is innocent. While the 1789 French Revolution raised the idealistic slogans of liberty, equality and fraternity, French imperialism, which developed from that bourgeois revolution, has a bloody history across the world…
When imperialist France had just emerged from German occupation after World War II, the Arab and Berber peoples began carrying out mass demonstrations and uprisings in Algeria against French colonial rule. To suppress that rebellion, for several days French troops and police, acting on orders from the French president issued on May 8, 1945, massacred as many as 45,000 Algerians who peacefully demonstrated in the cities of Setif, Guelma and Kherrata. The French occupiers killed as many as a million Algerians trying to hold onto that nation, until the people finally won their liberation in 1962.
In 1947, French colonial troops slaughtered 89,000 people to “pacify” a rebellion in Madagascar, an African island in the Indian Ocean. During the long French war in Indochina, the French military killed many more Vietnamese, Laotians, Cambodians and some Chinese until French imperialism was finally driven out in 1954.
Even in Paris itself, on Oct. 17, 1961, French police opened fire on a demonstration of 30,000 Algerians, killing between 70 and 300 people …
This history of imperialist military intervention continues. French jets are bombing today in Syria and Iraq, along with the U.S.-led “coalition.” French jets opened the air war against Libya in 2011, leading NATO’s barbaric destruction of that country.

Mass Surveillance Isn’t the Answer to Fighting Terrorism (New York Times)

It’s a wretched yet predictable ritual after each new terrorist attack: Certain politicians and government officials waste no time exploiting the tragedy for their own ends. The remarks on Monday by John Brennan, the director of the Central Intelligence Agency, took that to a new and disgraceful low…
It is hard to believe anything Mr. Brennan says.

The Drone Papers (Intercept)

The Intercept has obtained a cache of secret documents detailing the inner workings of the U.S. military’s assassination program in Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia. The documents, provided by a whistleblower, offer an unprecedented glimpse into Obama’s drone wars.

Nicole Aschoff, Connor Kilpatrick, Paul Heideman: The Socialism of Bernie Sanders (Jacobin)

The novelty of Bernie Sanders has long been his adoption of the term “democratic socialist” to describe his political beliefs. On the presidential campaign trail, by way of definition, he’s repeatedly pointed to European countries with relatively robust welfare states.
On Thursday, in a major campaign address, he turned back stateside. Sanders cast himself not as the heir of Eugene Debs — a portrait of whom hangs in his congressional office — but of Franklin Roosevelt. In short, for Sanders, democratic socialism means New Deal liberalism.

Palestine | Syria | Andalusia | Fortress Europe

Yoav Haifawi: Israeli police lock up Haifa activist for Facebook statuses (972mag)

Police detained and held Razi Nabulsi, a young Palestinian from Haifa for a week for statuses he posted to Facebook and Twitter, claiming they constituted incitement. The catch? Even though the statuses were posted publicly on the Internet, police declared them to be secret evidence and refused to publicly say in court what he was accused of writing.

Noam Sheizaf: EU to bypass its own anti-settlements guidelines (972mag)

Israeli and European officials are reportedly nearing an agreement that would allow Israeli institutions to continue operating freely in the West Bank while enjoying EU grants.

Yoav Haifawi: Syria – How did it all Begin? (Free Haifa)

It is basically revolution of the Syrian society, pulling the thrones of tyranny from its suffering body. It is a revolution that starts with the defense of human dignity and its main aim is to put an end to humiliation.

Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed: Fixing intelligence on Syria? (Monde diplomatique)

Dan Hancox: Spain’s communist model village (Guardian)

Marinaleda, in impoverished Andalusia, used to suffer terrible hardships. Led by a charismatic mayor, the village declared itself a communist utopia and took farmland to provide for everyone. Could it be the answer to modern capitalism’s failings?

To understand what happened near Lampedusa:
Philippe Rekacewicz: Mapping Europe’s war on immigration (Monde diplomatique)

Europe has built a fortress around itself to protect itself from ‘illegal’ immigration from the South, from peoples fleeing civil war, conflict and devastating poverty. The story is best understood through maps.

Palestine | Libya | Catalonia | Bangladesh | Kameroon

Michael Astor, Peter J. Spielmann: UN vote recognizes state of Palestine; US objects (AP/Google)

In an extraordinary lineup of international support, more than two-thirds of the world body’s 193 member states approved the resolution upgrading the Palestinians’ status from an observer to a nonmember observer state on Thursday. It passed 138-9, with 41 abstentions.

Ryan Craggs: Countries That Voted Against Palestine At UN Include United States, Israel And Canada (Huffington Post)

Just nine nations voted against the Palestinian Authority’s upgrade to nonvoting observer state status, which passed the General Assembly 138-9, with 41 abstentions.
Voting “no” Thursday were Israel, the United States and Canada, joined by the Czech Republic, Panama and several Pacific island nations: Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru and Palau.

Robert Fisk, Uri Avnery: One of Israel’s great leftist warriors wants peace with Hamas and Gaza – but does the Knesset? (Independent)
Reuters: Palestine envoy says Beijing backs U.N. entry (Townhall.com)
Barak Ravid: ישראל מחרימה 460 מיליון שקלים מכספי הרשות הפלסטינית Israel confiscates NIS 460 million in Palestinian Authority tax funds (Haaretz, ‘via DuckDuckGo and Google)
Amira Hass: אם אין מים, תשתו בננות P[alestinian] farmers hung out to dry while Israelis flourish in Jordan Valley (Haaretz, via DuckDuckGo and Google)
Seumas Milne: It’s Palestinians who have the right to defend themselves (Guardian)
Sergio Yahni: Cairo truce: sole path to independence is resistance (Alternative Information Centre)
Tom Segev: אלף כיבושים לא יכניעו את עזה (Haaretz) / Gaza without Gazans: History of an Israeli fantasy (Haaretz, via DuckDuckGo and Google News)
AFP Gaza office hit by Israeli strike, 3 Palestinian reporters killed in other attacks (RT)

Israel struck media offices in Gaza twice on Tuesday and killed three Palestinian journalists. The IDF claimed the buildings, which included an AFP bureau, were being used by Hamas to direct military operations, and were legitimate targets.
Two Israeli strikes have left three Palestinian journalists dead, with media buildings targeted by the IDF two days in a row. The AFP building was hit in another attack later on, with no casualties reported.

Dennis Bernstein, John Pilger: Israel’s Gaza Rampage: It’s Not Just War (CounterPunch)
Chris McGreal: ‘Israelis talk about fear, we Palestinians talk about death’ (Guardian)
Patrick O. Strickland: Blasting the Palestinians Back in Time (CounterPunch)
Gili Cohen: IDF arrests Hamas MP in West Bank (Haaretz)
Marlène Schnieper, Ilan Pappe: «Der jüdische Staat kann sich jeden Bruch mit dem Recht leisten» (Basler Zeitung)

Daniel Kovalik: Libya & Creative Destruction (CounterPunch)

Sirte suffered a catastrophe according to . . . many eyewitness descriptions of endless rows of buildings on fire, corpses of the executed lying on hospital lawns, mass graves, homes looted and burned by insurgents, apartment blocks flattened by NATO bombs. This is what ‘protecting civilians’ actually looks like, and it looks like crimes against humanity. Far from the romantic image of all of Libya having risen up against the ‘evil tyrant,’ this was one side of Libya destroying the other with the aid (to say the least) of foreign forces. …
Forte makes a strong case that the U.S. — despite some warming of relations with Gaddafi before the February, 2011 uprising — had continued to be frustrated with Gaddafi’s blocking of infrastructure projects for such U.S. companies as Bechtel and Caterpillar, instead granting these projects to Russian, Chinese and German concerns.

Samir Amin: An Arab Springtime? (Monthly Review)

Martin Roberts: Catalan separatists ‘fall short of majority’ in elections (Guardian)
Ralf Streck: Katalonien wählt radikale Unabhängigkeitsbefürworter (Telepolis)

Jason Burke, Saad Hammadi: Bangladesh textile factory fire leaves more than 100 dead (Guardian)

Augusta Conchiglia: Ghosts of Kamerun (New Left Review)

Shozab Raza, Parmbir Gill, Cornel West: “He’s had four years and proved himself to be a Wall Street President!” (CounterPunch)

Assange Ill, May Seek Safe Passage to Hospital (Novinite)

Philippines | Venezuela | Iran | Korea | Spain | France/Algeria | Chomsky in Gaza | Palestine/Israel | Finkelstein

Richard Javad Heydarian: US ‘pivots’ on the Philippines (Asia Times)

Gabriel Hetland: Why Chavez Won (CounterPunch)

On October 7th, Venezuelans voted to give Hugo Chavez a fourth term as president. With a historic turnout of over 80% of the electorate (a remarkable figure in a country where voting is not mandatory), Chavez handily defeated opposition candidate Henrique Capriles Radonski by an eleven-point margin: 55.14% to 44.24%.i In seeking to account for why this has occurred, mainstream media have studiously avoided the most straightforward explanation: a majority of Venezuelans support Chavez and the policies his administration has implemented over the last fourteen years.

Vijay Prashad: Bomb, Bomb, Bomb Iran (CounterPunch)

What was Netanyahu’s case against Iran? That Iran is close to having a nuclear bomb. This is an old saw from Bibi. In 1992, as a Member of the Knesset, Netanyahu predicted that Iran was “three to five years” from a nuclear weapon. He was wrong in 1992, and he is wrong now. Take the case of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) recent reports on Iran. The Director General of the IAEA provided a report to the IAEA’s Board of Governors on August 30, 2012. If you are able to get through the bureaucratic and legalistic verbiage, you’ll get to the two important sentences: (1) that the IAEA is confident about “the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities in Iran”; and (2) that the IAEA can “conclude that all nuclear materials in Iran is in peaceful activities.”

Markus Kompa: Iran könnte „in wenigen Monaten“ die Atombombe haben – seit 1979 (Telepolis)

Rüdiger Frank: An Atmosphere of Departure and Two Speeds, Korean Style: Where is North Korea Heading? (38north)

Juan Antonio Anunión: Wert quiere “españolizar” Cataluña (El país)

Reuters: François Hollande acknowledges 1961 massacre of Algerians in Paris (Guardian)

James Green: An Interview With Norman Finkelstein (CounterPunch)

Rami Almeghari: Chomsky in Gaza: academic boycott “will strengthen support for Israel” (Electronic Intifada)
Rana Baker: Reflections on Noam Chomsky’s visit to Gaza (Electronic Intifada)
Jonathan Cook: The full story behind the war against free speech in Israel’s universities (Electronic Intifada)
Harriet Sherwood: Israel’s cranes reprove Barack Obama’s failure to pursue two-state solution (Guardian)
Budour Youssef Hassan: Protests and strikes as Israel raids Bedouin villages, threatens to destroy homes (Electronic Intifada)
Yitzhak Laor: הווילה בג’ונגל / Wealth without borders (Haaretz) / Wealth without borders (via Google) / Wealth without borders (via DuckDuckGo)

The Israeli economy and all its elites were built up and exist via continuous “foreign aid.” Of the 46 donors to Benjamin Netanyahu before the Likud party primary, 37 were Americans. In these pages last week, Shlomo Avineri called on “organizations that fear for the fate of Israeli democracy, such as the Israel Democracy Institute,” to take up cudgels against this trend. (And where does the institute’s money come from?) …
But the outrage over the American donors derives from a hallucination: that our democratic institutions represent all citizens in exactly the same way the parliament in Stockholm represents the people ruled by the Swedish state. Alas, for 45 years, Israeli democracy has been ruling over an occupied population, which has no representation and is not entitled to determine any issue connected to its life.

Angela Davis: Jim Crow and the Palestinians (CounterPunch)
Oudeh Basharat: The original Morris (Haaretz) / The original Morris (via DuckDuckGo / Google News) / בני מוריס האמיתי (Haaretz)
Coby Ben-Simhon: Benny Morris on why he’s written his last word on the Israel-Arab conflict (Haaretz) / Benny Morris on why he’s written his last word on the Israel-Arab conflict (via Google News)

Assange | Spain | Syria | Greece | Canada | Korea | Israel

Phillip Adams, John Pilger: Extradition of Julian Assange (ABC)
Phillip Adams, Paul Preston: The Spanish Holocaust (ABC)

Syed Ali Wasef: ‘NATO behind Houla massacre’ (PressTV)

Mick Brooks: ‘Payback time’: Lagarde’s Myths (karlmarx.net)

Greece is a country divided, like Britain, the USA and France, along class lines. When asked about the cuts in public services that the IMF insists on imposing, [Lagarde] blames the Greek people, declaring repeatedly, “They should also help themselves, by all paying their tax.” Is that it? Is the problem just that all Greeks are tax dodgers?
Workers employed in a public or private sector workplace in Greece pay income tax automatically, just like British, American or French workers. They have no choice. It is deducted at source. When they buy goods in a shop, they pay the Value Added Tax (VAT). How can they not pay?
Greek millionaires do not pay tax. Instead they employ expensive accountants to dodge their obligations. This is very expensive for the Greek state. Because the rich don’t pay their share it also means that the resulting restricted budget spending imposes hardships upon poor Greeks, who are at the sharp end of cuts in public services.
This tax dodging by the rich is not a Greek characteristic. It is a characteristic of the rich and of big business.

Spain must avoid an Irish turn (Financial Times)

Martin Lukacs: Quebec’s ‘truncheon law’ rebounds as student strike spreads (Guardian)

Any group of 50 or more protesters must submit plans to police eight hours ahead of time; they can be denied the right to proceed. Picket lines at universities and colleges are forbidden, and illegal protests are punishable by fines from $5,000 to $125,000 for individuals and unions – as well as by the seizure of union dues and the dissolution of their associations.

Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, Anna Kruzynski, Amy Goodman, Aaron Maté: Maple Spring: Nearly 1,000 Arrested as Mass Quebec Student Strike Passes 100th Day (Democracy Now)

Gavan McCormack: North Korea’s 100th – Celebrations Gone Awry (Japan Focus)
Gavan McCormack: North Korea’s 100th – To Celebrate or To Surrender? (Japan Focus) / 北朝鮮衛星発射にあたり、ガバン・マコーマック論考-朝鮮半島の問題を歴史的にとらえる必要性 (Peace Philosophy Center)
Rüdiger Frank: North Korea after Kim Jong Il: The Kim Jong Un era and its challenges (Japan Focus)

David Sheen: Proto-Pogrom Against Africans in Israel (storify.com)
Gideon Levy: Israel is the most naive and racist country in the West / סכנה יותר גדולה מהמהגרים (Haaretz)

Israel is both the most racist and most naive country in the West. Racist, because in no other country can politicians make remarks about migrants as they do here and still remain in office another day; naive, because only now has Israel discovered the problem that has been facing the “first world” for years.
ישראל היא המדינה הגזענית והתמימה ביותר במערב. גזענית כי בשום מדינה אחרת פוליטיקאים אינם יכולים להתבטא כך על מהגרים ולהמשיך עוד יום אחד בתפקידם; תמימה כי רק עכשיו היא מגלה את הבעיה העומדת זה שנים לפתחו של העולם הראשון.

Iran | Spain | Israel-Palestine | Syria | Honduras | Kissinger–Zhou

This article in the New Yorker unfortunately is behind a paywall:
Seymour M. Hersh: Iran and the Bomb: How real is the nuclear threat? (New Yorker)
Flynt Leverett, Hillary Mann Leverett: America’s on-again / off-again love affair with Iran’s nuclear programme (Race for Iran)

Manifesto; also in Castilan, Basque, Catalan, Asturian, Aragonese, Galician, German, French and Italian (¡Democracia Real YA!)

Barak Ravid: Secret cables show Israel’s battle plan over Palestinian UN bid | משרד החוץ לשגרירים: כך תמנעו הכרה בפלסטין באו”ם (Ha’aretz)

M. K. Bhadrakumar: Turkey’s not-so-subtle shift on Syria (Asia Times; version with links to sources at MRzine)

Mark Weisbrot: What Manuel Zelaya’s return means for Honduras (Guardian)

Winston Lord to Henry A. Kissinger: Memcon of your conversations with Chou En-lai (PDF; National Security Archive)